No Wellness Wankery

80: "My body hasn't changed. I just used to hate it and now love it" Maz's Real Story

September 26, 2023 Lyndi Cohen
No Wellness Wankery
80: "My body hasn't changed. I just used to hate it and now love it" Maz's Real Story
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Despite leading a glamorous life and having a successful career travelling the world interviewing rockstars, Maz Compton felt utterly disconnected and dissatisfied.

Her solution? Ditch the booze and switch up her lifestyle. 

Maz went from not being able to get through a few days without a drink to 8 years without a sip of booze. It all started when she took a break from booze and to discover what a hangover free few weeks felt like. It turns out, that was the best choice.

It's not all about alcohol, though. Maz also opens up about her struggle with body image and self-esteem and how the pressures of being a household name took their toll.

How did she break free? Well... Let's find out.

Ps. Have you listened to this episode and are ready to learn to unwind and socialise without booze?

Welcome to Booze Break. Jump over to the Booze Break website and you can listen to the first episode for FREE.

Still not sure if this is for you? Take my free quiz to see what type of drinker you are. 

Want to feel more in control around food? My FREE webinar has my top 4 strategies to help you stop overeating.

Try my Back to Basics app FREE for 7 days.
It's got everthing you need to be healthy without dieting at your fingertips.

Looking for more support to feel in control around food? I'd love to support you in my Binge Free Academy

If you don't already - come follow me on the gram at @nude_nutritionist (no nude pics, sorry).

Want to share some feedback or have an idea for an episode, I'd LOVE to hear from you - hit me up at hello@lyndicohen.com

Lyndi:

Oh, hello you wonderful human, and welcome to today's episode of the no. Well in the Swanky podcast you never know what I'm gonna sing a jingle, and today was your day. In the background you can hear that giggling person is the incredible Maz Compton, who's radio personality she's a mum and she's also the person who I've been building something called Booze Break with, and we wanted to talk about your experience with Booze, why you gave it the middle finger a few years ago.

Maz Compton:

So welcome to the show, maz. Thank you, lindy. I thought you were gonna call me your bestie for a sec, because I feel like we've spent so much quality time together curating an amazing program that I'm so, so, so proud of, and it's been, it's just been a real treat hanging out with you and getting to know you and Les it's so. This is just, you know, like the icing on the cake for me. Oh, love, icing on cake.

Lyndi:

I'll take that. Thank you, um Maz. For anyone who doesn't know you, can you take us right back? To why the f did you ditch alcohol, when literally it's everywhere and how people schmooze? You know it was eight or nine years ago that you were like nah, I'm done.

Maz Compton:

Yeah, so in 2014. So let's go back, wind back the clock 2014. I got into a situation with my life where I drank every day without fail, but my life wasn't chaotic. Or leaving Las Vegas, you know, all those sort of images that movies conjure up about people that have alcohol use disorder or like raging alcoholics and they're homeless and unshaven and they have no shoes. I had heaps of shoes, right like. I had a really great radio contract. I was earning loads of money, getting flown around the world interviewing rock stars and pop stars, living my best life on paper, but I was drinking every day and I think at the time, when I look back now, I was very disconnected to what was happening in my life and there was a level of dissatisfaction, a level of imposter syndrome, and I just didn't feel right about me, and so, instead of dealing with those feelings, I drank alcohol, especially Pino, and it got to a point. So there were probably two big events in 2014 that were my like wake up call. I won't say rock bottom. I think we need to rethink that. I didn't have a rock bottom. I had like a couple of red flags and then I decided to draw a line in the sand. So red flag number one was my friend Carly was having birthday drinks on a weekend. I was like are you coming to my birthday drinks? And internally I was like that is the last thing that I want to do, because I don't want to drink alcohol, but I don't know how to socialize without it.

Lyndi:

Yeah, like I like you as a friend. I think you're divine. But can we do it in another?

Maz Compton:

way Correct, but I didn't have the awareness to even frame it like that. So all I could say, was, sure, babe, and, but internally, like hating that, and so that, right, there was a disconnect. I was then putting myself into a situation that I didn't want to go into, but I didn't know how to navigate without alcohol. So I was either going to go to the party and drink, which is what I didn't want to do, or I was going to stay home and, to be fair, I probably would have just drank wine by myself anyway by that point. So lose, lose, right. So this sort of started my sober curiosity. This was when I was like, why do I drink? Why can't I get through a week without booze? Or I could get through maybe two or three days, but then something would happen that would make me drink. Whether it was gerri in accounts, or whether it was a bad day or a good day, or I had a win or whatever, there was always a reason to drink alcohol and I didn't want to do it anymore, right? So this sort of conflict, this internal conflict, became really apparent. So Fast forward from Carly's birthday to September 2014 and, really tragically and very unexpectedly, my manager, mark Byrne passed away and I got a phone call to say that he had died and I was just. I'd never felt anguished before, but I felt like someone had taken my legs out from under me when that happened, he was not just a manager, he was my best friend. He was like a bit of a fill in dad there's a whole dad back story on me and it was just like I was so broken and so lost in this moment. And what did you think I did? I went to the bottle shop and I got a bottle of wine and I drank myself silly because I didn't know how to process emotions. And that was the next moment that I was like okay, maz, whenever anything happens in your life, whether it's good or whether it's awful, the only way you know how to cope is to drink alcohol. There's got to be another way, because I was feeling like shit all the time. So I was waking up feeling like crap, going to work feeling like crap and then drinking myself silly because I was feeling like crap and I was just stuck in this cycle and it was debilitating. But I was still going to work, I was still functioning, I was still friendly, I was still like everything's good in my world, but internally like not having a great time. So after Mark's funeral I really landed on like I just it's like that echo from my mother that said she used to say she used to say a lot of things that have stuck with me, but one of them was if you keep doing the same thing and expect a different result, that's the definition of insanity. And I felt like I was going insane. So what I decided to do and this wasn't helpful, so don't do this but I Googled am I an alcoholic? And then I read the description of and look to be fair, now we wouldn't even use that word. It's not a helpful word at all. We use words like alcohol use disorder. But at the time I said to Google hey, siri, whatever, am I an alcoholic? And I read it like a medical description of the term alcoholic. And then I read a little bit of the AA manifesto and I was so annoyed because it turns out I wasn't an alcoholic and I was searching for a label, I was searching for a box to put myself in and I thought, if I'm an alcoholic, that's great, I can go to rehab. But I wasn't and so I didn't know what I was. So I kind of went on a mission to figure out what alcohol meant to me and could I exist without it, and after a few months of like ruminating on those thoughts, I landed on change the behavior. Let's take a bit of time away from alcohol. And that's how you ended up doing an alcohol free experiment, right, that is exactly what I came up with because I couldn't really figure out what to do. And so, like knowing mum, like yelling in my brain, change your behavior. I was like what's the? Do you know what's funny too, lindy. It's like just the stories that we tell ourselves to justify our position is so wild. And so I remember at one point I was like, ok, I've got to change my behavior, I'm going to be a vegan.

Lyndi:

More food restriction.

Maz Compton:

That's what I need, that's probably not going to fix that whole drinking issue that you've come up with. And I was like, OK, I'm going to stop buying shoes. And I like came up with like four or five things that I thought the change of behavior would be enough. But I really was just trying to convince myself that, yeah, change was going to be hard. I didn't want to actually stop drinking, but I did so. Eventually I got to a point where I was like, hey, Maz, why don't you stop drinking? That might fix the drinking problem you have.

Lyndi:

Let's give that a whirl. And just a side note on this whole kind of idea we can go through this phase of hating on ourselves and having really shitty self-esteem and going through a period of going oh, like. I just feel awful. I know something needs to change and I think diets are so often positioned to us as like this is going to fix you. Yeah, and whether it's vegan or cutting out carbohydrates, because we see these glossy like transformations of someone who are like sad and depressed before you know they're always frowning in the before photo and the after photo they're like I'm so happy, I'm thin, Hooray, and I think that that's all wrapped up in diet culture and you know I'm not pro restrictive eating, but I do kind of think there's a difference between alcohol and food, which we can talk about a little bit later. But here you are, experimenting without alcohol and what did people say? How did they react to you?

Maz Compton:

Yeah, so this was really interesting. So, going into what I decided to do, I was like January one's a great day because I've got plans to New Year's Eve One last hurrah, yep, and I gave it a good nudge. And so on the 1st of January I stopped drinking and it was so easy because I was really hungover and I was like this is a cinch. I had pizza for lunch, I stayed in the air conditioning all day and then the next day was pretty easy too, because I was jazzed on the fact that I'd gotten through a whole day without alcohol. And then day three sucked, and day four sucked, and day five sucked, so you had to sit with the suck. I had to sit with the suck and I'd never sat with the suck before, and that's you know. I don't want people to go into a season away from alcohol thinking that it's going to be roses, because it's really challenging. We drink for a reason, and for me it was because I couldn't feel my feelings. I was thinking my feelings and so I was soothing, I was managing pain and I had no other way to do. It Like alcohol became my multi-tool of coping. So I sat with the suck for a few days, but after I sat with the suck for a bit. I love that expression, by the way. I've just said it 20 times and it's awesome, it's yours now.

Lyndi:

You're welcome, thank you.

Maz Compton:

Thank you. It'll be on T-shirts soon available on my website. No, I sat with those emotions and then I started to kind of work through some stuff and figure some stuff out about me and maybe why I had gotten to a point where alcohol had become my secret best friend. And I will be honest, I missed alcohol in that month because everything that I did in my life was attached to alcohol. So I had to change a few things, Like I changed a lot at once in a way. So I stopped drinking, but then drinking was such a part of my persona in media that I still had to go to sales events and parties and whatever and not be the person drinking. That was a big internal reframe.

Lyndi:

You were a host on MTV Like back in the day. Back in the day, right? So you'd kind of have to be this shmoozy personality. Got to go meet celebs, be cool. And what have we learned to identify as being cool? Well, drinking alcohol, sex in the city, totally, totally made me think that martinis with the girls was how I would be cool and have fun.

Maz Compton:

And what I found out is that it is possible to have fun with that alcohol, holy shit. But I wasn't sure. You know, like that was me rolling the dice. You know, heading into that month with that alcohol, I was like, oh dear Lord Jesus, what am I going to do with all of the time that I'm going to get back? And even though that's an exciting prospect, at the time it was really overwhelming. Firstly, because I realized how much time I was spending drinking, like every single afternoon for hours.

Lyndi:

Entire weekends getting taken up by ordering drinks, drinking, recovering from drinking, and then you look back at the weekend going. What did I?

Maz Compton:

even do and you forget everything.

Lyndi:

You forgot it all. Anyway, I forgot it all anyway, but I did.

Maz Compton:

I was looking down the barrel of like really big vacuous spaces in time and I was like what am I going to do? Turns out there's plenty of stuff to do other than drinking. Guys, who are you? Yeah, I know, and I've done them all now.

Lyndi:

Just to draw a parallel on this whole idea of using food as a coping mechanism and drinking for a coping mechanism. This to us so aligned if anyone listening hasn't ever thought about them. So often we do emotional eating as a way of soothing ourselves. We might go I've had a really shit day. I just need to go on the couch and I just need to eat whatever, and that's how I'm going to process through tough times. And we also celebrate with food. So sometimes you go, oh my goodness, it's such a win. Today I'm going to go get myself a pastry or six and go home and celebrate on the couch. So it is one way for us to self soothe and alcohol is another way. So what we're doing with both of those things is we're saying, hey, what I'm feeling right now is too hard for me to process alone and this is going to help me self soothe. The issue is with alcohol. I mean there's a few issues, but one of the issues is is it really is that whole throwing gasoline onto our problem? So we kind of postpone that feeling. We have a momentary lull of going oh, I feel a bit better, maybe a little blip of 10 minutes, and then, as we start to get those withdrawal symptoms. Serotonin don't mean, a whole bunch of stuff starts to change and it means that we actually go into a worse place. You come out of that hungover, going ugh that it not soothe, that did not help, and so we stay stuck in this vicious cycle of needing to self soothe with the food and with alcohol. And there is such a parallel between how we use these things, which we talk about in a lot more detail in Booze Break, but I just wanted to point it out there.

Maz Compton:

Great, great, pointing out Wholeheartedly. Agree with everything you say.

Lyndi:

Yeah, can we talk a bit about your relationship with food and your body image? Yeah, oh, my gosh I just talked to me through, like at the time when you were this like big celeb you know you were household name for me. Growing up I was like I knew who Mads Compton was I watched you on TV as like a kid going, she's super cool. How did it feel to be thrown in the limelight and people looking at you, assessing you? Did it impact your?

Maz Compton:

body image 100% and not in a great way. So this is something that I talk a little bit in my book about. I touch on it. I absolutely exercised because I hated my body and I, when I got the job on MTV the fact that I got it and I wasn't a model as in yeah, I'm five foot one guys, I'm a pocket rocket so I think the reason, one of the reasons that I got the job on MTV was because I was different. But it was really difficult to accept that I was the difference. So I think I just I punished my body because I didn't want to get any more different, and I don't know that the people who made these particular comments meant it in a way that would really impact me. But I've I had a stylist, you know, complain that I was too big because I didn't fit into a sample size and then basically cancel a photo shoot because they were like she's too big, and so I had this narrative constantly that I wasn't good enough. But then I had this job that was saying and all of these people that were saying that I was amazing and I was the girl next door and you know. So I had this constant conflict and constant like really negative self-taught going on and I feel like there is definitely a part of me that was in the very tiny back of my brain that was constantly going just enjoy this, because one day they will figure it out and you'll just lose your job and they'll get someone hotter, and that was that was a real fear of mine. And then over the years, you know like they hired this girl, this girl, lindsay Rodriguez, who's still a very great friend of mine, but they and she was a model but they I feel like they pit us against each other and so we had a really tough time because we were really great buddies but they would like send her on one assignment and then me on the like. It was so Cutthroat and this was in like my family fold of MTV family and Lindsay and I've talked about this she she works at Kindred official now and she's a mom and she's got a cute barb and we bonded over that and she had me on her Podcast and we were able to actually really unpack some of that toxic behavior that some of the people who worked there had and the impact and effect that it had on us. But from a personal point of view. I grew up with a mum who was always Drinking skim milk and skim everything and locale, and so that was just like you know, screamed into me and I feel like I just got on that bandwagon of like, well, I'll do the lemon detox diet, I'll do this detox, I'll do the beetroot diet, I'll do the cabbage soup, that like I just did them all.

Lyndi:

It sounds like your drinking was so correlated with this idea of this imposter syndrome of feeling like your body wasn't good enough, you weren't pretty enough, you weren't you know what you thought they needed you to be totally. And so you drank as a way to self soothe.

Maz Compton:

Yeah, because those feelings were so real and so big and I couldn't let that get in the way of the job that I had to do.

Lyndi:

Right, it's such a big bloody deal. I mean people who say something like, oh, worrying about your weight is just vanity, like, come on, it's not a big deal. No to a woman. We have been taught our entire lives that this is our very worth, that our Essence of who we are. We are only as good as how pretty we are, and that is conditioned into us from the day we are born pretty much, and our mothers tell it to us and the people around us tell it to us in our magazines, and Everyone feels that, and we're all controlled by this so that when we're growing up we never feel pretty enough. So there you were. You know the height of your career, everyone else looking up to you, going, oh my goodness, this girl has it all, and you, having this internal, I have not arrived, I am not good enough, totally. And then you get to, you get older and you get to a point where you go, oh, I wish I could have looked the way I did back then. But you just know that you didn't like yourself back then either, and I think you know.

Maz Compton:

so, lindy, it's so layered, like when you really start to like open pandora's box on it, it's just like Holy crap, like what have I been through? What have I?

Lyndi:

put myself through and, like all you'd want to tell that younger self is God. You're great right now, and just to hold on to this fact that you are exactly doing what you're meant to do, and I think we have this idea. If I lost weight, I would be happier, things would be better, and that's just not not the case.

Maz Compton:

It's not the case and I know that for a fact because I have, like I said, I've done all of those detox bits and pieces and, yeah, like you lose a bit of weight pretty quickly because you're literally just eating beetroot for two weeks.

Lyndi:

You're, we, and.

Maz Compton:

Purple poop yeah, 100% like burgundy it was. That was probably my favorite part of it because I was like this is hilarious, this is almost comical. But I would drop weight and I would look rail thing, I would look unhealthily thin and I would still be unhappy. Yeah you know, and so Just never served me. And and you are right, when the alcohol was absolutely a part of that whole equation for me, where I was working in this industry, which I loved, like I loved, and I couldn't even believe it I think that's part of it too I was like I can't even believe this, I don't deserve this, and it all really spins around to this big self-worth Question and I didn't have enough of it and it wasn't ingrained in me, it wasn't instilled in me and I was. I was pit against other women in my industry and it was. It was just not, it was just toxic.

Lyndi:

I think the reason I do any of this work is because I want the next generation. So anyone listening, if you've got kids, I think if we can change how the next generation gets raised, especially our little girls, and give them the sense of like a deep self-worth, like this inner confidence where they just like themselves, they freaking like themselves it's very hard to push around someone or bully someone or put them into compromising positions when they really respect and like themselves. I think about all the times my life where I've been vulnerable and I've allowed shitty things to happen to me and people to like take advantage of me. It's just because I had poor self-esteem and self-worth. So, this is everything that we're doing. Talk to me now about your sense of self-worth, right? So you've been on a journey.

Maz Compton:

Right, man, I'm still on the journey. So when that first month that I stopped drinking, I wrote a journal every. I'm a mad, hardcore journal. I love journaling. Don't have heaps of time for it these days, but I made a real Like thing about journaling every day. I was like of this 30-day thing that I'm doing in January 2015, I want to commit to journaling and so there were days where it was like I would write pages and pages. And then there were other days where I didn't feel like writing anything, so I would write about that rather than use that as an excuse to skip a day. And then I got to the end of the month and I kind of parked the journal and Then I sort of decided I'm gonna get to my birthday and then I'll get to the mid-year and like it just Naturally progressed. I I did not set out in January 2015 to never drink again. I just was like this is working for me, like I have sat with the suck. I'm feeling a little bit better now and I felt like for me, journaling was probably helping to process those emotions rather than suppress those emotions, which is what I was doing with alcohol. But a few months in, maybe even a year in, I reread my journal and that is where I fell in love with myself, because I read about this girl who was broken but was just so keen to Shape a better future for herself by making big and bold choices. And I read about this girl who was so confused about things that had happened in the past but wanted to write them for her own Self-worth. And I read about this girl who was just bold enough and brave enough to make a really daring choice and stick with it Because it was working for her, despite people's backlash and people's opinions. And I just I read about this girl and I was like she's so amazing, she's so cool. And then I was like that's me, like it was really like a really profound, like amazing experience, and that's where I then started to do the work and I was like you're enough, you're okay, and it's definitely something that I still wrestle with, absolutely Like I have, you know, since then become a mum, and that's another area. Man, oh my God. The identity crisis that happens when you become a mother, and the mum guilt and that there I'm, like that's been a whole other beast for me. But I'm so glad I figured that part of my self worth story at that point in my life because I was able to develop really great tools to deal with those bigger things that come up like when life just throws you a curveball. You know I've fashioned this really great response mechanism to really crappy stuff that comes my way and I feel like that is serving me really well in this season of life.

Lyndi:

Because self worth right. We're not going to go from really crappy, crumbly self worth to freaking liking ourselves the next day. It is almost like climbing a ladder, and so each time we're doing these big, brave kinds of investigations into ourselves, we're kind of getting that one step closer to being someone who's innately cool and likes themselves Right.

Maz Compton:

And so the one thing that I have landed on because I have thought about that experience a lot in the nineties that I almost nine years that I haven't had a drink and what I kind of landed on was this so the essence of me has never changed. My opinion of it has. So the girl who was writing in that journal, who stopped drinking for that season, was still me. I just had a really shitty version of who she was in my brain and I redefined my version of who I was. But I've always been me. Does that make sense? Like my body's always been my body. I just used to hate it and now love it.

Lyndi:

Right, and it's the same body.

Maz Compton:

And it is the same. I mean, it's the same body. Like my boobs are a little bit hanging a bit lower these days because of breastfeeding, kid, but other than that, like pretty pretty much, and regardless of this, if this body is bigger or smaller or wobblier or whatever, it's still mine, and so taking ownership over that was really powerful for me as well to go. This is mine to love and this is, this is meant to be, the temple, right, so I'm going to treat it with some respect.

Lyndi:

I think, when it comes to health, we're so often chasing this behavior change. I have to change the behavior and then like everything else going to fall in. But you change your thoughts of something and then the behavior tends to shift. So you changed your perspective of yourself. You did change your behavior as well, but a whole bunch of other flow on effects happened as a result of you going. I'm going to start to think differently and challenge myself a little bit. Yeah, and this is why we're talking about the credit, this product called boost break, and the reason we created it is because we were like I did this little experiment as well. Where have you seen it? You know I'm not drinking alcohol right now and just seeing how long it lasts, who knows? Yeah, and it's freaking great, I'm really enjoying it. And so, if you're listening, we're kind of going. Maybe there is this huge transformation that's waiting for you, and it's not this silly before and after weight loss challenge transformation that you've been promised, but a much more intrinsic, deeper, self worth transformation that could be just around the corner for you, and it takes a bit of a gamble to go. Let me make this behavior change, which is, you know, removing something that you know is probably a tie to a whole bunch of embarrassing, regretful or guilt feel fueled moments for you, and going on a little experiment to say how do I feel without this for a little bit, and it's not a life sentence, it's just a little booze break and you can determine how long you want your booze break to last. What we're suggesting is that you start off with 30 days and, if you like, hey, this is pretty cool, I don't mind this 60, 90. After 90 days, your brains had a chance to rewire itself, and one of the things that we talk about in booze break is this idea of how it impacts your impulse control centers, and you can actually be a whole lot more consistent when you find you're not drinking alcohol, did you?

Maz Compton:

find that yes. So after the first 30 days, I, somewhere in around like day 22 23, I legit woke up and I was like did I take the pill from the matrix? Because everything looked different, everything like it sounds a bit cheesy, but I swear I woke up because the sunlight hit me on the face and I opened my eyes and the sun was glistening off the trees and the birds were chirping a little louder. Like really, I was really spaced out. I was like this feels really weird, but like beautiful and amazing. And what I realized was that's clarity. That was actually this is how we're meant to see the world, this is how we're meant to exist in the space that we're in. And I was so aware like my, my senses were all really heightened and I was like have I just been running on a 60, 60% capacity for basically my entire adult life? Because I have been drinking and drinking has been dumbing me down and dulling down my senses? And I realized like okay, if this is how I'm meant to see the world and exist in it, then this is, this is where it's at, and that is why I think. From there I was like let's just keep going and see how we go and I again like in that time I never did it, never, never. I wasn't like I'm never drinking again and I didn't demonize alcohol, I was like I'm just better without it. So I'll just stick with the not having it until see how long that lasts, and it's it's been nearly nine years.

Lyndi:

It's been a good experiment yeah yeah, the experiment is still going. Strong, guys, this is what I'd like people to know as well he don't have to wait until you have a problem with alcohol to stop drinking. For me, I was drinking maybe one standard drink a day and it still was having a big impact on my mood or my anxiety, on my mental clarity, on oh, my goodness, oh so many things. And for you it was also. You weren't taking boxes of having alcohol use disorder, and yet you still took this plunge and go. I'm going to try something different.

Maz Compton:

Yeah.

Lyndi:

I'll keen for a different outcome. Yeah, now, if anyone, if you are listening and going oh is a booze break right for me, I'd love you to give it a go. We will like oh, how do we give you booze break for free? And so you can listen to the first episode of booze break totally for free and be like what's this all about? Find out more about it. What you can do is go to my booze breakcom and go check it out and go get that freebie. It's also on the podcast, so as you're listening, you scroll back a few episodes. You're going to find that it's right there waiting for you, so you can go ahead and start listening to it right now.

Maz Compton:

I think a really great question that people can ask themselves if they're not sure, if they're like well you know, maz said she was drinking a bottle of wine a day and that sounds outrageous. And then other people might be like Maz said she was drinking a bottle of wine a day and I drink three. Like you know, I think it's sometimes unhelpful to talk about amounts because at the end of the day, it doesn't matter how much. Matters is how it's impacting you. So, whatever your relationship with alcohol is, the question is I call with it? Are you cool with how alcohol is showing up in your world? If you call with it, take a break anyway and see if anything shifts. And if you're not cool with it, then take a break and see what shifts. So my advice is whether you are okay with your relationship with alcohol or whether it's feeling a little uncomfortable. Either way, a bit of time away just gives you space to reassess and see what part you want it to play in your world.

Lyndi:

Moving forward, so we don't have to make huge commitments, we don't have to say we're never drinking again. We just got to give it a little bit of a trial to see how it goes. And, of course, all your big questions will be answered in booze break. So things like how do I stop drinking and then not end up binge drinking afterwards? How do I not turn to food for comfort if I'm reducing or pulling back from alcohol completely? Why is it that we can create a restriction around alcohol but we wouldn't do the same for food? Why are they being treated differently? I know it's all a bit nuanced and a bit crazy. We're answering all those questions in booze break and if you're going, I'm not sure. Am I someone who needs to do this? We also have a free quiz that you can give a go and go. What kind of drink am I? Am I a social drink or a binge drinker? Or am I just totally cool and healthy with my relationship with alcohol already? What you can do is hop onto Instagram and you can send me a DM, write a comment on any of my posts say booze quiz, and you can get that quiz and just start filling it out and get some results. Get some clarity, do some internal work. I mean, that sounds like boring and unfun. Just ask yourself some simple questions, that's it, mas. Thank you so much for being on. No, well, unless Wankery, if anyone listening would like to go and check out, mas, you can follow her. Mas, underscore Compton.

Maz Compton:

Just Mas Compton.

Lyndi:

Just Mas Compton. No underscore Just Mas, Compton, Just Mas, you know just she is the Mas Compton One the only Mas Compton.

Maz Compton:

On Instagram I have a podcast called Last Drink. It's bloody good. Please call this a treat, thank you. There's yeah, there's a ton of really great conversations with people who don't drink, and it's celebrities that you might know, like Oshar and David Campbell, have shared their stories, and Umi Steins, and then people who write in the sober space to just random people like Libby, who I used to do yoga with a few years ago.

Lyndi:

So if you're curious, that podcast is so good and your book you are now an author and it's called Last Drinks and I read it when I was in my recent holiday and I loved it, Thank you. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. I'm so grateful. It's a pleasure. Thanks for being my booze break buddy.

Maz Compton:

Aw, thank you.

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