No Wellness Wankery

86: I quit dieting, but I’m gaining weight. (Part 1)

November 07, 2023 Lyndi Cohen
No Wellness Wankery
86: I quit dieting, but I’m gaining weight. (Part 1)
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Have you ever wrestled with the idea of intuitive eating, only to find yourself buried under weight gain concerns and that pesky voice in your head leading you back to dieting?

Sometimes in the non-diet world, speaking about weight loss can be taboo. 

Especially if people are on different stages of their own journey in rebuilding their relationships with food and their bodies.

But I can't help but often think this is where we lose people back to diet land.

This all kicked off again after I received an email from a lovely listener called Penelope - who says the age old statement 'I have tried and failed at intuitive eating, and each time returned to restrictive eating'.

Have you quit dieting but are gaining weight?

What should you do next?

Let's talk about the importance of checking in with our hunger and ways to create a healthier home environment without feeling deprived.

Want some budget friendly recipes to get started? Download for FREE

I know this is a huge topic - and we will chat more about it next week. But if you want more right now... check out this 3 part series:
60: So you want to lose weight? Let's chat. (Part 1)
62: So you want to lose weight? Let's chat. (Part 2)
63: So you want to lose weight? Let's chat. (Part 3) 

Ps. Unsure if you're accidentally dieting? Find out with my free checklist.

Want to feel more in control around food? My FREE webinar has my top 4 strategies to help you stop overeating.

Try my Back to Basics app FREE for 7 days.
It's got everthing you need to be healthy without dieting at your fingertips.

Looking for more support to feel in control around food? I'd love to support you in my Binge Free Academy

If you don't already - come follow me on the gram at @nude_nutritionist (no nude pics, sorry).

Want to share some feedback or have an idea for an episode, I'd LOVE to hear from you - hit me up at hello@lyndicohen.com

Lyndi Cohen:

Oh, hey you good thing, and welcome to no Wellness Wankery this week. It's a goodie, well, it's a biggie. It's kind of like the elephant in the room with intuitive eating. The fact is that for some people, when they start intuitive eating, it can lead to weight gain, clothes getting tighter and that ick feeling, that strong desire to go on a diet can kick in, understandably because of all the things that have been told. So I wanted today's episode to feel really practical, very doable, and that's why I have Jenna DePiece in the house to help us today.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yes, this is such a huge topic for me. So when I saw this email come through from Lovely Penelope, I was like Lindy, we have to talk about this and I need to read it to you because it's so good. She says Hi, lindy, I came across your podcast early this year Yay, thank you and it's been eye-opening in so many ways. I love the whole approach and, as somebody who also started dieting when they were 12, can I get out? What the hell? Yes, you can. It's the kind of support and perspective shift that I need. However, I feel this. However, I feel as if I've tried and failed intuitive eating several times now. Every time, about after a month, I become so aware of my weight gain, my clothes are tighter and there's an added jiggles from my step, which sounds cute, but it doesn't feel that way. It is cute, I agree, it doesn't feel that way. And then, when this happens, the radio breaks, the diet eating disorder channel gets stuck and it's like someone has turned up the volume and broken the knob Every time I return to restrictive eating. I know this is a pivotal step to push through, but I feel, as in so many ways, it's the hardest because it happens when we're so early on the intuitive eating journey and haven't built up the mental stamina to hold strong. Penelope, I feel you on so many levels.

Lyndi Cohen:

Because, jenna, this has kind of been a part of your experience, hasn't it?

Jenna D'Apice:

100%. It's every day. It gets easier, but also gets harder. You've trained your whole life to be like I need to lose weight, and then you need to switch off the I need to lose weight and let yourself potentially gain weight in order to free yourself from these thoughts. And it's such a cycle because you're like oh, maybe I'll just do this, because then I'll lose a bit of weight, but I don't want to get in. This thing is like I don't want to get out of control, I don't want to keep putting on weight, but then you realize that you restrict and that's probably is what's going to happen, and then you get very caught up in your head.

Lyndi Cohen:

In your episode and episode 77, you shared more about what it was like when you hopped on the scale for the first time in a long time and some of the ways that you started to process through seeing a number that you didn't really want, but how you process through that. And if you have listened to that episode, please go and have a listen. It is so good I think I cried. It's juicy and awesome. But let's talk about this idea you mentioned just then, jenna, like is there a way to like add in little things without you know with the things are going to make us feel restricted. Right, if we try to do anything, it's so easy for us to feel restricted.

Jenna D'Apice:

This is it. You're so early in the journey that, even like, I'm considering like getting like a sports watch thing to like track my steps, and I know that would be good for me. And then I'm just like am I doing that? Because I think if I get to 12,000 steps a day, I will lose weight, because I've watched some stupid Instagram reel that told me that 10,000 steps equals blah blah calories. And then a week later I want a sports watch. So I'm kind of like, where is that idea coming from? Is that coming from a good place, or do you know what? I mean? Everything has some link. I'm like why am I actually doing this?

Lyndi Cohen:

The diet brain is strong. I want to start by saying that intuitive eating, firstly, it is not something that we use for weight loss, and I can't help but think that so many of us start intuitive eating with this goal in mind that ultimately, I would like to lose weight. That's why I'm doing it really, and so we do have this little conflict here between that and I have to say, to effectively do intuitive eating, you need to suspend your desire to lose weight, and I do use that word intentionally suspend I have talked to people about, like you know, god is like stop wanting to lose weight. But I kind of think that's a huge leap. If you've gone your whole life going, I have to lose weight. So just by suspending it, it's like OK, just for right now we're going to focus on intuitive eating and heal a relationship with food and then see where we're. At once we get on the other side. I think that's useful, but not using intuitive eating as a means to lose weight. The reason being is, as soon as you go, oh, I need to lose weight. It's really tough to eat intuitively because you don't give yourself permission to eat the right amount of food, to feel satisfied and then, like, as you're eating, you're like, oh, I shouldn't be eating this. There's always, like those diet, the diet thought in the back of your brain. So that's the number one thing. Yes, penelope, you nailed it. You do have to suspend that desire to lose weight. Number two I want to talk about this idea of intuitive eating. I don't have an analogy like totally pegged down, but it's kind of like going through a murky forest where you're like things get a little bit harder before they get easier. So you're in this middle phase and especially if you've had a history of disordered eating, there's a whole bunch of things that we need to do before we get to baseline. So think about baseline being like when you were a kid and you ate intuitively, naturally. We're now trying to take decades decades in many cases of dieting and we're trying to go let's get back to baseline Now. That is a very important thing because so many people they try and pursue weight loss before they get back down to baseline. And what baseline is to me is it's a healthy, trusting relationship of food. It's going. I trust and know that any time I want more food I can have it. I know and trust that chocolate is always available to me, or chips or peanut butter and as a result, I'm not binge eating. I might still have a desire to weigh a little bit less, but I don't have the disorder as strong and, as a result, I'm kind of a little bit more stable. I think that's a very important step to get to before anyone goes okay, we need to try and like add in little healthy habits.

Jenna D'Apice:

Add in extra things.

Lyndi Cohen:

Yeah, like, where are you at?

Jenna D'Apice:

Are you, would you say, you're a baseline, yet I think I'm at baseline, but I still think that the desire for me to lose weight is kind of like a scary one, that I'm not confident to do anything that might. I know how to say this. Every habit that I think of, I'm thinking, am I doing this to lose weight? And then I think I'm feeling so much better in everything that I'm doing that I'm scared to go back down there and then get back to where I was. So it's a hard way. Like half of me is like I'm feeling so good, I'm loving cooking and not feeling guilty around food. But then the other part of me is but I do want to lose weight, but I'm kind of scared to do anything about that because I'm scared to go back to how I used to be.

Lyndi Cohen:

Okay. So the idea of what was once restrictive when you were in this disorder dieting state does change once you get to a point of baseline. I now do things that binge eating me would have been seen as like disordered and crazy. But because the reason I do it is so different, it doesn't feel restrictive at all. So, for example, I, if I feel like I've just come back from holiday and like the amount of chocolate I ate was exceptional, like I'm, it was brilliant. I love chocolate. But I came home and I was like you know what I feel, like I'll feel better if I don't keep chocolate in my house. So I'm not keeping chocolate in the house and that feels really helpful. It feels very supportive. I really like that. It doesn't feel at all restrictive because I know and trust anytime I want to go and eat chocolate, I can't like. That is such an understanding that I've built in myself. So whilst years ago that would have felt restrictive, it does not to me anymore.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yes, Okay, I see what you say. So it's like it's, you can have it in the house because you don't want to feel restrictive. But then you could also get to the point where, like, I didn't need to have it in the house, but I know that if I really feel like it I can go get it. It's still around.

Lyndi Cohen:

So let's do the watch thing right. So perhaps in the past the reason you had a watch was like I want to lose weight, I need to move 10,000 steps. I have an arbitrary goal. If I don't get to 10,000 steps, let's say it's 990, I'm going to jump around my bathroom like a lunatic. This is it. I don't want that 11 PM at night. I don't want that for you either. So that was old you, but how could new you baseline you who's like? Listen, we have a more trusting relationship with our body and food. We know exercise is about enjoyment, foods there to be enjoyed. But how can we then go? Oh, listen, I do think if I got a fitness watch, it might be motivating or it might feel fun or it might be one of these things. And so I think sometimes we get scared because it felt yuck to have that restriction in the past. But that same habit, when viewed through a different lens, doesn't have to feel restrictive. But this very much depends on how far into this in-shield of eating journey you have ventured and come and the issue I found. So, as I said, so many people try and add these. I mean they're healthy habits. They try to add them back in, but they still have that restrictive mindset so that they keep. They can't make them sustainable and doable. Another thing I used to do is I have like a daily mental health walk, which is basically an hour long walk every morning. Now you know, if I said to you you have to walk an hour every morning, it can feel really restrictive, but for me it was coming from a place of I really enjoy this. I can't wait to do this. I know I'm so much better off with this. And now let's say we took a whole bunch of these habits and we added them in. Would there be an influence on your weight? Yes, certainly there would be. But I think what's really crucial is that the reason you're doing it is not too loose weight. No-transcript, there might be a part of you in the back of your mind that goes oh, that will be another side effect. And it's just one more thing. I don't think it's realistic to be like, oh, I have zero care about weight, but it cannot be the reason you are doing it. So, jenna, if the reason you are getting a fitness watch or contemplating it is to lose weight, don't do that.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yeah.

Lyndi Cohen:

If you think it could be a fun little way to motivate myself I think it might be nice to see how much I'm moving my body Then I think it's worthwhile for an experiment. And you might go, oh, this does feel restrictive, and then it goes into the top drawer for a few more months until you do feel ready for it.

Jenna D'Apice:

So then we start to welcome in this idea of these micro experiments, so adding in things that once perhaps felt restrictive, and going, oh, how does this feel now that I've got this new lens of food is always available and exercises enjoy is enjoyable so it's even like Not striving to like I have to get 10,000 steps every day because then it's a rule and something that I need to do in terms of it could just motivate me to like, oh, maybe I might just Take the stairs instead of the lift one day, because I'm like, oh, I want to get a few more steps, as opposed to having a number I have to hit every single day.

Lyndi Cohen:

Indeed, and to build on that, it would also be you just living your life wearing your watch for a week and then being like, oh, on this day I felt really good. Huh, I wonder what the step count was on a day like that and just trying to go oh, how does my body feel on certain days? So Totally disregarding that. And then you know, there might be days where, like you really need a rest day and you have 3,000 steps, and that is actually really cool to see that I, once I gave birth, I had a C-section. I have a hard time with just like Slowing down and having a messy house. So I feel like I was frantically cleaning my house but I needed to rest and my, my watch would be the thing that helped me slow down, because I'd be like, oh my goodness, I've done 7,000 steps already and I'm meant to be recovering. That's way too much, yeah. So just remembering as well that watch can also help you rest when you need to take rest, and it can also be a little bit motivating.

Jenna D'Apice:

So what would you say to like Penelope in that first stages, when you're so at the beginning and you can feel yourself putting on weight?

Lyndi Cohen:

Oh, I really think that let's talk about the scales for a second, because I think that's such a huge trigger for so many people. I'm now at a point where I can weigh myself and it's neutral. I'm like it's amazing, truly, it's neutral, I don't think, and most people who are still recovering at this point would be ready for it. So like can I just say Scales, go in the garage, scales get gifted, they're somewhere else, somewhere else. Someone else can have that pain, but we're not weighing ourselves yet. We do still have that like clothes are getting tighter. So we know we've got this like this feedback loop. Once we're baseline, what we can start to go is go. There is choice around food now. So once you've been doing this for a while, you go okay, I can order takeaway anytime I want and I have, in fact, I've been doing that a lot recently or I know I can eat you know the burger and chips for lunch anytime I want. Once you realize that, and you truly know that, then you go Okay. But now I realize food is a choice, so I can choose between the sandwich, the salad or the burger. What do I choose and what's gonna make me feel good? So that's the two kind of these two questions that I want you to ask yourself is what will make me feel satisfied? And, to balance that out, is what will make me feel good after eating this? Now I Don't want this to come across as like I don't know if that's gonna make some people feel restricted, but for me, sometimes I go, you know I'm looking at a menu and I go, oh, that burger looks really good. Then I go, I don't think I'm gonna feel awesome after I eat. That it's got nothing to do with weight, but I just know it's not gonna make me feel good and I many times end up choosing a salad, not at all because it has fewer calories and sometimes it might not, but because I know that's what's gonna make me feel good.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yeah, so it's shifting the mindset of what's the lowest calorie and your old restrictive mindsets of a menu as opposed to. It's nothing to do with weight, but what do I feel like, eddie, and what? What do I feel good after I eat?

Lyndi Cohen:

Indeed, and you've come out of this phase of refeeding, which is kind of the process of going, rebuilding the trust and making sure your body doesn't think there's food scarcity. It knows that any time at once food, it can have food. So now you realize that there's no shoulds around food, yeah, rules around food. No one gives a shit what you eat or don't eat. You are just, you are the custodian of this body of yours and you get to make choices around the kinds of foods that make you feel good. Can we talk about discomfort and this idea of discomfort? So I don't know why it was this huge epiphany epiphany for me this year, but like it's, it was. Discomfort is unavoidable. Yes, so now that I am kind of whenever I go through a phase of being like I wouldn't mind weighing less and I have talked about this in Previous episodes, there was a three-part series, in fact, that we did that it's it's. I mean, I think it's awesome. Please go listen to that as well. I'll put it in the notes.

Jenna D'Apice:

Thank you.

Lyndi Cohen:

There's definitely this moment where you can ask yourself Okay, let's say, I have a craving in the afternoon and I feel like having some chocolate. I know chocolate is always available to me, so I guess I choose, but I don't think I want to eat it right now. So I choose the discomfort of feeling the craving and not responding to the craving, because I know I would have discomfort if I ate it and I didn't want to eat it.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yeah, I understand what you're trying to say. That is a tricky concept to convey. It's like you now have the choices, but you don't always have to choose.

Lyndi Cohen:

yes, yes, and it's only because you know you can choose yes anytime that the choice now appears and is available.

Jenna D'Apice:

Because I feel like another thing that weighs in my mind is and it's kind of like, the diet brain is still there and so strong, so it's like you can use it to your advantage by talking to it. It's like, well, if you do want to lose weight eventually, all the other ways you tried in the past didn't work and made you feel terrible about yourself in everything. They made you feel guilty and shameful around eating and it didn't work. So it's like, whenever I'd feel the temptation to go back to that, it's like, no, but that didn't work, so why would I go back to something that didn't work?

Lyndi Cohen:

I think that's spot on. I think it's the hardest thing is to not get propelled back into diet land, and so I think the way that intuitive eating can fail us a bit at the moment is it doesn't give us a concrete plan of what to do now. Like what? Now? One thing I think you can absolutely do if you are at baseline and you feel ready for it, is creating a healthy home environment. Now, I know in the intuitive eating space there are people who are going to be like if I don't keep biscuits, chocolate chips and all my trigger foods in my house, it's going to make me feel restricted. But if you get to a point of being at baseline, where you kind of know these foods are always available, as I talked about the chocolate thing, helping yourself eat healthier to make your body feel better is so useful to do at the grocery store because you only have to make the decision once that these are the foods I don't feel like eating, that I know they're not going to make me feel good, rather than needing to say no to them 10 or 20 times during the day. Now, if this idea of creating a healthier home environment feels at all restrictive to you, perhaps say perhaps you're not at this baseline level of being ready to go and add in these kind of habits. Maybe not, but it might be a really supportive thing. We just going, I'm just going to make it a little bit more supportive to me making healthier choices. Of course there are times where you're like, well, my kids eat these foods, or my partner eats these foods, and to that I say, well, that's part of life and that's normal. But I think it's just becoming curious about little things you can do and it has to be a choice. You can't feel like punishment, like oh, I'm not allowed to buy these foods. Of course you are, you are. It's either a choice or it's not, and don't make it anyone else's choice.

Jenna D'Apice:

It's such a tricky thing to articulate, when you have been in the same mindset your whole entire life, that this is not going to happen overnight. I think that's also a thing people need to remind themselves. If you feel like your clothes are getting tighter, then you are changing, basically rewiring your entire brain around food and something you need to put in your mouth minimum three times a day to survive and exist. So it's pretty big stuff that you are working through.

Lyndi Cohen:

I don't know if I've talked about this enough, but I definitely gained weight before I lost weight. I don't know how much, because I wasn't weighing myself.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yeah, you mentioned before the concept of refeeding. What is that?

Lyndi Cohen:

Well, I guess it's an eating disorder term and it's the process of refuelling the body after a period where it's felt like it's in bin instavation. So you know, for someone with anorexia nervosa that's a process of helping their body like very slowly refeed itself and so, I hope, whole protocol around that. But in the case of something like binge eating or even disordered eating, it's the process of your body learning to trust that food is allowed. And you know, it might be like I was never allowed to have KFC. So now I've kind of gone through a period of going I know actually KFC is allowed and you have it enough times until you reach a point where you truly trust that KFC is allowed and you would do that with different foods and things that you felt previously had been forbidden. Jenna, do you think that you've now at that point where you've finished that refeeding period where there is total trust that anytime you want food it's available to you?

Jenna D'Apice:

Yes, I think I actually have, because I flagged it just the other day because we've also been on holidays and we came back and there was no groceries and Dwayne, my partner, was going to baseball training. He started playing baseball, which is fun, and he was like I'll get take away on the way home and I was like, okay, cool, that's fine. And normally the old me was like I like Thai, because I can get this Thai and no rice and I feel safe with Thai, Anyway, and he was like I'll get Thai and I'm like, okay, cool, and I was mentally prepared for that and he said he'd be home at like eight o'clock or whatever. And then he ended up getting home until like almost 10 with like all this fried food because the Thai restaurant was closed and I felt I actually had clicked in my brain that normally that would have really upset me and I would have been like, but no, I've prepared for this food that I was going to have and the fact that I just I was like, okay, well, this is the food we have and I just ate some of it and went to bed and I didn't feel guilty or anything and I was like, okay, I think I have reached another milestone of I don't feel upset because the food changed around me.

Lyndi Cohen:

That's incredible because I think when you're in that previous step the murky, intuitive eating waters you definitely can get quite angry if food is not as you imagined it would be or worth the calories or silly phrases we hear.

Jenna D'Apice:

No, so I feel like I'm definitely at baseline, where I feel a lot more comfortable and ready to try new things. I've started like swimming, which is something that I've never really done before, and I'm just like enjoying it and not doing it for any specific reason. So I do feel like I'm at baseline.

Lyndi Cohen:

How does the idea of creating a healthier home environment feel to you? Does that feel restrictive at the moment?

Jenna D'Apice:

No, I don't think so. I think what I probably need to work on more is getting into meal prepping and meal planning in a way that doesn't feel restrictive in terms of when you're going to work three days, four days in the office a week and getting lunches ready so you have healthier options without your old mindset of spending all day Sunday shopping and making 18 of the same meal. Please don't do that. So you know, like there's one end of the pendulum or the other end of I've done nothing so I'm getting take away every day for lunch.

Lyndi Cohen:

You know what I?

Jenna D'Apice:

mean finding your in between. Of that, I think would be helpful for me now.

Lyndi Cohen:

Now this is not even like a subtle drop, but like my Back to Basics app. This is exactly what it's being designed to do, because to have to plan out your meals ahead of a busy week is just such a mind-numbing, unfun activity so we never do it. So with just a few buttons you just add some options to your planner and you can even get them added to your grocery cart and it all kind of simplifies it and in fact you choose which days you might want to have something. So I think so often when you know there's extremes when it comes to these meal planning meal prep apps, no, you don't have to cook everything. Every single meal has to be a new recipe. That's insane. Even doing one, two, even three on the out the limit new recipes a week is a big frickin' deal. And if you double the quantities and then you have, even if it's just two recipes that you do a week and there's some in the fridge and then you pop some in the freezer for like next week or the week after, so that you don't have that repetition, it's incredibly helpful to do. If you haven't tried Back to Basics, you can try it free for seven days and just see like what's it about, how does it work and can it make meal planning and all this stuff a little bit easier? And hopefully it can.

Jenna D'Apice:

Yes, and there's so many good recipes with Back to Basics Like, but I've never really had eaten legumes and beans before, because I have no idea why Wait what did you?

Lyndi Cohen:

just, you didn't tell me to.

Jenna D'Apice:

No, I told me to, anyway. And there's so many good things in terms of like legumes and tin foods and like microwave rice, and like the easiest salads and lunches you can make with stuff that just is in the cupboard already.

Lyndi Cohen:

Yeah, we really, we really try to make it affordable as well. I think there's a lot of people who say using Back to Basics helps them save money on their grocery bills, which at the moment, with grocery prices as insane as they are right now, I think that's a really big and important one, and that's another thing to be gained out of doing a little more prep and a little more thinking about what you're going to cook is the fact that you're going to save a heck of a lot of money. Like, just going back to this intuitive eating thing yeah, the whole intuitive eating thing. I think sometimes the non-hungry eating is something that we can often do. I definitely notice if I'm feeling like my clothes getting a bit tighter. I think that's one of the first few things I do. Do I go oh, am I actually waiting until I get hungry? One clue that you're not waiting until you get hungry is if you find that you generally eat the same way every single day and of course, there are patterns in how you eat and generally hunger can strike at certain times and it just becomes rhythmic. But if, like, let's say, you eat, you know, have a big family dinner and it's like seven courses and it's like you know, one of those those nights Do you wake up the next day and eat the exact same way you normally do? Is your hunger saying the exact same thing it normally does? I think so often we get into default eating Every time I re-hone in on this. Listen, I don't want to eat when I'm not hungry. I'm going to really just focus on hungry eating at the moment and waiting. I realize I don't actually need as much food as I thought I did and so much of me was eating on autopilot and because you just have to wait until you feel hungry, it doesn't feel restrictive at all, because you're like, okay, well, just eat that later, and so it's just a matter of just delaying, or I'll do that tomorrow, and it doesn't at all feel restrictive. But I think heaps of us eat on autopilot and I just think that's a very useful one to check in on.

Jenna D'Apice:

So maybe that's a big thing to go back to, like the hunger scale and just seeing how you feel.

Lyndi Cohen:

Indeed, indeed, and just getting back to the basics there. Once again back to basics the app there's like a hunger scale tool to help you tune into your hunger, because it's such an important one. The other thing I'm going to throw out there is this idea of mindful eating. Now, I don't think many people know, but mindful eating is fundamental to intuitive eating. Now, this is not the same as be mindful about your portion sizes, which is just like don't eat too much. Really, that's basically ruined that word for me there. But no, mindful eating, what is it? It's just like not being so tuned into this dive voice that's in our head, being like, oh, you shouldn't eat too much, you've eaten too. You know this is the wrong thing to be eating. You need to save something on your plate. Oh no, you've gone and ruined it again. It's very hard to be a mindful eater when this noise is happening, and I know you said that that feels like that radio has broken and I know it's really hard sometimes, but at bare minimum, some things we can be doing is sitting at a table to eat our meals, especially around those times when you're kind of going oh, like I tend to kind of after dinner. That's when it all kind of goes crazy. I know I normally have my phone. I'm like scrolling on my phone and I'm watching TV at the same time as a bowl of ice cream in front of me. I'm like how did this happen? This is not mindful eating. And so just kind of coming back to this idea of mindful eating is like you're checking in as you go to go. How does this make me feel? And sometimes you might finish a big bowl of ice cream and go, oh, mindful eating might be like that didn't make me feel awesome, or maybe that did make me feel awesome, I don't know. But you're going to have to tune into your body and, as you said, we're doing experiments. So in my book, your weight is not the problem. I talk about this idea of these micro experiments and, jenna and Penelope and anyone listening, this is what I want you to start to do. Start to go. Am I at baseline yet? A very important question Get back to the basics when it comes to intuitive eating. Am I actually waiting until I feel hungry or am I just eating because I want you to go? I'm going to have a plan. I'm going to start to try to add in little habits, bit by bit, and not because I want to lose weight and then see how it makes me feel and then build up from there, realizing that there is absolutely choice in everything. I'm choosing to eat everything and I'm allowed to sit with the discomfort of having a craving and going oh you know what? Today I'm choosing. I might not have that and I think that's what's going to make me feel good. Remember those two questions what is going to satisfy me and what will make me feel good after eating this? And I think, if it's there for you, creating that healthy home environment, I think it can be helpful for some people. It depends on where you are in your journey. I'm going to add in those little habits, bit by bit, and within a couple of weeks I think you should start to feel much better in your body. And one more thing fiber is very important to not feel bloated. So so often when we feel really bloated and tight enough around our stomach area, our clothes are tight there. Sometimes it is just a matter of we're feeling quite bloated because we haven't been eating much fiber, and fiber, my friends, is in fruits and vegetables and stuff. So when I've just come back from my holiday. Honestly, for dinner we just do like cheese and crackers sometimes and it was awesome, but I was definitely not eating nearly enough fiber and so I got home, had so much fiber within like two to three days. I was feeling so much better already and I avoided that temptation to go on a diet. So there are some tips for you everyone. I hope that's been helpful for you.

Jenna D'Apice:

That was actually very helpful. I you did because you write so many times like even I've just got back from holiday and you instantly you've been eating like not your normal foods all week and it's so easy to go on the temptation to diet. But you're probably right, like I just wasn't eating your fruit, the vegetables, probably wasn't drinking enough water, and if you just do those things, my body would just I'll probably would start going to the toilet normally again and I would feel better, absolutely.

Lyndi Cohen:

It's as simple as having a good pill. Anyway, everyone thanks for all seeing today's episode. I hope it was useful. Of course, if you like this show, you're welcome to share it with friends or family, and we will always love a review of no Ones Wankery, so we can help destroy diet culture together.

Navigating Intuitive Eating and Weight Gain
Mindset and Choices in Food/Exercise+
Trust in Food Choices and Planning
Tips for Better Health and Well-Being